Cell at Christ Church St Leonards

Cell at Christ Church St Leonards

A couple of articles from 2023 that deal with Cell

Hastings Independent Press

Cindy Oswin’s Cell

ELIZABETH ALLEN on Cindy Oswin – writer, librettist, actor, academic – and her new one-act play showcasing and interrogating Julian of Norwich

“All shall be well, all shall be well and all manner of thing shall be well.” 

Cindy Oswin

Many people will recognise this lyrical expression of ultimate hope, but not everyone will know that the lines form part of a text written by Dame Julian of Norwich, the first woman known to have written in the English language.This year is the 650th anniversary of the publication of that text, Revelations of Divine Love, and Dame Julian is the subject of Cell, a one-act play written and performed by Cindy Oswin and soon to be staged at Christ Church in St Leonards.

Dame Julian is a wonderfully interesting subject. Having lived through a severe illness and the terrible years of the Black Death, which killed off nearly half the population of Norwich, as an older woman she chose to become an anchorite, and lived for nearly forty years enclosed in a small cell. As a visionary and wise woman, she became a national celebrity, and numerous visitors came for counsel, communicating with her through a tiny window called a squint.

Read more at Hastings Independent press…

Hastings Online Times

650 years of Julian of Norwich’s Revelations

Cindy Oswin has a remarkable career as actor, director and writer. Her most recent commission was to write a play about the mystic, Julian of Norwich. The result is Cell – a one-person play about this mysterious woman with a man’s name who spent nearly 40 years locked into a 12 foot square room. Erica Smith asked Cindy to tell her more…

Cell is based on the life and work of Julian of Norwich, who was the first woman to write in English. Julian was a medieval mystic, who chose to be enclosed in a cell – women who elected to do this were called ‘Anchoresses’. They would sometimes have a small window where women from the congregation could come to ask them for advice.

Read more at Hastings Online Times